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STEM Pre-Academy

Welcome to the STEM Pre-Academy!

The STEM Pre-Academy fosters inspiration and relevance in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics primarily through initiatives, such as teacher workshops, technical focus sessions, and collaborative interaction between middle school teachers and subject matter experts. This teacher-driven multidisciplinary program helps middle school public educators develop and implement research and technology based student curriculum including lessons, activities and projects.

The STEM Pre-Academy is a state-funded program, focused on public middle school teachers in Hawaii.


Latest News

Visit the new miniblog on Mobile Devices - Mobile Learning!

We've kicked off a new miniblog on this site and hope you’ll join the online conversation to learn more about the various mobile devices that are now inundating the consumer market and some of which are now being used in the classroom.


Nutrition Researcher Speaks to PE Classes

When science and engineering principles collide, the result can be quite practical with far-reaching effect as students at Jarrett Middle School learned in October from UH Jahren Geobiology Laboratory Research Technician, Josh Bostic.

Josh gave a great presentation to 3 PE classes at Jarrett Middle School on the science behind added sugars in the standard American diet. The students learned that making healthy food choices now will help keep their bodies healthy and free of chronic diseases in the future.


Follow-up Mini Workshop: Water Quality Field Trip to Kualoa Ranch

On Saturday, July 26, 2014, teachers from Waipahu Intermediate, Aliamanu Intermediate, Moanalua Middle and Ewa Makai Middle schools met at Kualoa Ranch Educational Center to participate in the STEM Pre-Academy Water Quality Follow-Up Mini Workshop.

Dr. Marek Kirs, a researcher at the University of Hawaii Water Resources Research Center, shared his research data and insight on water quality in the streams and beaches in Hawaii.


Feature Project: iPad Enabled Digital Publishing @ Moanalua Middle School

At Moanalua Middle School, Language Arts teacher Kathy Nagaji and her team piloted a project with students entitled, “iPad Enabled Digital Publishing”. They drew inspiration from the October 2013 iPad workshop co-presented by STEM Pre-Academy, Hawaii Creative Media, and students from Searider Productions, Wai`anae High School.

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sbrown

"We use the vantage point of space to help better understand of our home planet."

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edwinjcolon

Good news for the environment. Prove that 100% renewable power is possible. #renewableenergy

Costa Rica hits 75 days powered entirely by renewable energy - CNET
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lifescienceswahiawa

Thank you to Dr. Rowland and Emily First for coming out to Wahiawa Middle School to conduct their ever popular seismology activity. It was a natural extension to the geology unit the 8th graders just finished. We had already practiced triangulating earthquake epicenters using an online simulator (http://www.sciencecourseware.com/virtualearthquake/vquakeexecute.html) so the students were well prepared in regards to the content and the math. But nothing can match the excitement and engagement that accompanies swinging sledgehammers and collecting data from geophones. #wahiawamid #earthscience

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Photo Credit: Thomas Lee
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spramento

Thanks to Women in Technology (WIT)

2015 SketchUp Pro software available free to Hawaii schools
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sbrown

Fantastic!

BBC wants young students to code on tiny Micro Bit computer | Ars Technica

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